June 8 Celebration – Albany, NY

June 8 Celebration – Albany, NY

* We were not able to gather the names of everyone in these photos prior to posting this slideshow. If you recognize anyone who is not named in the captions, please let us know. Click here to email Blynda Barnett. Thank you!

St. Joseph Chapel, Albany, New York, June 8, 2019.

St. Joseph Chapel, Albany, New York, June 8, 2019.

L-R: Viola Persia and Ron Musto.

Janet Walton, SNJM, left.

Shannon Lenet, Associate, right.

Molia Sieh, SNJM, Kathleen Pritty, RSM and friend.

Janet Walton, SNJM

Mary Anne Vigliante

Michele Musto

Academy of the Holy Names Choir Ensemble with conductor, Theresa Moran.

Academy of the Holy Names Choir Ensemble.

Virginia Bonan, SNJM

 

Kathy Yanas

Kathy Yanas

 Elizabeth Kavanaugh

Carroll Ann Kemp, SNJM

Carroll Ann Kemp, SNJM

Bea Hall, SNJM

Bea Hall, SNJM

Marilyn Marx, SNJM

Marilyn Marx, SNJM

Shannon Lenet, Associate

Shannon Lenet, Associate

Mary Ann Dunn, SNJM.

 

Mary Ann Dunn, SNJM

Visiting in the Chapel.

 

Visiting in the Chapel.

 

Kathleen Keller, SNJM.

 

Kathleen Keller, SNJM.

 

Mary Ellen Holohan, SNJM

 

Karyl Fredericks, SNJM

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM, Ann Marean, SNJM and Rhea Clark.

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM and Rhea Clark.

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM extinguishing the flame, with Rhea Clark.

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM and Rhea Clark.

 

Janet Walton, SNJM, Maureen Delaney, SNJM and Rhea Clark.

 

Bea Hall, SNJM and Kathleen Griffin, SNJM.

 

Vicki Cummings and Maureen Delaney, SNJM.

 

The reception begins.

 

The reception begins. Kathy Yanas, center.

 

The reception begins. Shannon Lenet, Associate, far left.

 

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

 

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

 

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

 

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

 

Reception entertainment, L-R: Ron Musto, Michael Hurt and Gary Nowik.

 

Vicki Cummings, Susan Bues and Maureen Delaney, SNJM.

Reconnecting. Ann Marean, SNJM on right.

Joan Bailey, left.

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

Friends of AHN/SNJM. Shannon Lenet, Associate, center.

Friends of AHN/SNJM. Marilyn Marx, SNJM, left.

AHN Choir Ensemble members.

Friends of AHN/SNJM. Elizabeth Kavanaugh (floral dress).

Mary Ann Dunn, SNJM (left), Eileen Dunn, SNJM (center) and Mary Glavin, SNJM (right).

Patricia Mills, SNJM

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Gates, Sister Helen

Gates, Sister Helen

Sister Helen Gates, SNJM

(Sister Clarita Mary)

September 13, 1922 – May 20, 2019

Sister Helen Gates, SNJM who departed this life on May 20, 2019 at Marie Rose Center, Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Helen celebrated 96 years of life and 74 years of her religious profession.

Mass of Resurrection will be celebrated on Thursday, June 6, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. at Chapel of the Holy Names, Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Burial will take place following the funeral at Holy Names Cemetery, Marylhurst, Oregon.

Sister Helen Gates, SNJM

September 13, 1922 – May 20, 2019

Sister Helen Gates, age 96, died at Marie-Rose Center at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon, May 20, 2019. A member of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary for 74 years, her funeral will be held at 11 a.m., June 6, 2019, in the Chapel of the Holy Names, Lake Oswego.

Daughter of Harvey and Urania Saindon Gates, Helen grew up in Central Washington. She met the Sisters while she attending Marylhurst College. After two years, she entered and received the name Sister Clarita Mary.

For much of her career Helen was a music teacher. However, she first taught primary grades after earning an education degree at Marylhurst College. Having studied piano for years, she realized a long-held dream when she was assigned to teach music.

Leaving teaching, she spent 10 years at Marylhurst College as receptionist and copy center coordinator. On retiring, she was receptionist at Convent of the Holy Names, Marylhurst, drove Sisters to appointments and provided music for liturgies in the Sisters’ Chapel.

Sister Helen is survived by her nieces and nephews and the members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

Will, Sister Geraldine Ann

Will, Sister Geraldine Ann

Sister Geraldine Ann Will, SNJM

(Sister Michael Joseph)

December 4, 1932 – May 18, 2019

Sister Gerrie Will, SNJM departed this life on May 18, 2019 at Villas of Saratoga, in Saratoga, California.

Sister Gerrie celebrated 86 years of life and 65 years of her religious profession. 

Her Mass of Resurrection will be celebrated on Wednesday, May 29, 2019, at 10:30 a.m at Holy Spirit Chapel, Campbell, California.

Burial will take place following the funeral at 1:30 p.m. at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Hayward, California.

Corbey, Sister Patricia Anne

Corbey, Sister Patricia Anne

Sister Patricia Anne Corbey, SNJM

December 11, 1954 – April 21, 2019

Sister Patricia Anne Corbey, SNJM departed this life on April 21, 2019 at home in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Sister Patricia celebrated 64 years of life and 33 years of her religious profession.

A wake service was held on Tuesday, April 30, 6–9 p.m. at St. John the Baptist Church, 12319 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland.

Funeral Mass took place at the same location on Wednesday, May 1, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. The church was open for viewing at 10:00 a.m.

Burial took place following the funeral at Gate of Heaven Cemetery, 13801 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland.

Dykzeul, Sister Mary Grace

Dykzeul, Sister Mary Grace

Sister Mary Grace Dykzeul, SNJM

(Theresa Elizabeth Dykzeul)

February 22, 1924 – April 18, 2019

Sister Mary Grace Dykzeul, SNJM departed this life on April 18, 2019 at Villas of Saratoga, Saratoga, California.

Sister Grace celebrated 95 years of life and 75 years of her religious profession.

Her Mass of Resurrection was celebrated on Thursday, May 2, 2019, at 2:30 p.m. at Holy Spirit Chapel, Campbell, California.

Burial took place at 10:15 a.m., Friday, May 3, 2019 at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Hayward, California.

Lord, Sister Carolyn Jane

Lord, Sister Carolyn Jane

Sister Carolyn Jane Lord, SNJM

(Alma Mary)

November 13, 1934 – April 15, 2019

Sister Carolyn Jane Lord, SNJM departed this life on April 15, 2019 at Marie Rose Center, Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Carolyn celebrated 84 years of life and 64 years of her religious profession.

Her Mass of Resurrection was celebrated on Thursday, May 2, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. at Chapel of the Holy Names, Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Burial took place following the funeral at Holy Names Cemetery, Marylhurst, Oregon.

 

Sister Carolyn Jane Lord, SNJM

Alma Mary

November 13, 1934 – April 15, 2019

Sister Carolyn Jane Lord, age 84, died at the Marie-Rose Center at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon, April 15, 2019. A member of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary for 64 years, her funeral will be held at 11 a.m., May 2, 2019, in the Chapel of the Holy Names, Lake Oswego.

Jane grew up in the Seattle area. In 1953, she entered the Holy Names Sisters and later received the name Sister Alma Mary, after her mother and sister. Upon receiving a B.A. in elementary education at Marylhurst College, she taught in schools in Salem, Portland, Lake Oswego and St. Paul where she was principal. At one time she also served as administrator of the Sisters’ Care Center at Marylhurst for a number of years.

Sensitive to the changes occurring post-Vatican II, she decided early on to get a master’s in theology and religion and to teach adults and do parish ministry. Upon completing her master’s in religious education at Fort Wright College, Spokane, she worked in parishes in St. Helens, Cottage Grove and Sutherlin.

Applying her parish ministry experience, Sister Jane was also a member of the religious education faculty of Marylhurst College. While with the College, she travelled the Northwest visiting many parishes, working with the teachers and teaching theology and scripture courses. She enjoyed going to the different parishes, seeing what they were doing and assisting them with what they needed.

Sister Jane was a gracious, welcoming person with a warm smile and generous spirit. Upon retiring, she was associate director of the Oregon Associate program helping to develop the program to be a full part of the Community. During this time the program was opened to both women and men and to persons who are not Catholic. Sister Jane held strongly: “If their spirituality fits with our spirituality, and their idea of ministry fits with ours and they want to join us, then they are welcome.”

For many years Sister Jane also assisted with hospitality at the Sisters’ guesthouse at Marylhurst and cantored regularly for services in the Sisters’ Chapel.

Sister Jane is survived by her sister, Gwen Patton, Des Moines, WA, her nieces and nephews and the members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

Schroeder, Sister Virginia

Schroeder, Sister Virginia

Sister Virginia Schroeder, SNJM

(Urban Mary)

January 2, 1945 – March 19, 2019

Sister Virginia Schroeder, SNJM departed this life on March 19, 2019 at Marie Rose Center, Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Virginia celebrated 74 years of life and 53 years of her religious profession.

Her Mass of Resurrection was celebrated on Thursday, March 28, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. at Chapel of the Holy Names, Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Burial took place following the funeral at Holy Names Cemetery, Marylhurst, Oregon.

 

Sister Virginia Schroeder, SNJM

Urban Mary

January 2, 1945 – March 19, 2019

Sister Virginia Schroeder, age 74, died at the Marie-Rose Center at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, March 19, 2019. A member of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary for 53 years, her funeral will be held at 11 a.m., March 28, 2019, in the Chapel of the Holy Names, Marylhurst, Oregon.

The daughter of Al and Clara Keber Schroeder, Virginia was born in Salem, OR. Growing up, she attended St. Vincent’s School and Sacred Heart Academy where she became acquainted with the Holy Names Sisters. Graduating as part of Sacred Heart’s 100th class in 1963, she entered the Holy Names’ novitiate the next August and later received the name Sister Urban Mary (after her uncle Father Urban Keber, OSB). Upon completing a B.S. in education at Marylhurst College, she taught in Catholic elementary schools in Coos Bay, St. Helens, and St. Ignatius, Portland. During this time she obtained a master’s in education from Western Oregon State College and moved on to secondary school ministry at LaSalle High School, Milwaukie and St. Mary’s Academy, Portland.

In a career change, she pursued a master’s in pastoral studies from Seattle University and began work in parishes including Holy Trinity, Beaverton; St. Alice’s, Springfield; St. Jude’s, Eugene; St. Mary Star of the Sea, Astoria; and The Madeleine, Portland. Her extensive work experience prepared her for her mission at Mount Angel Seminary, where she served as Assistant Director of Pastoral Formation and Director of Admissions. The seminary honored her with the St. Michael the Archangel Award for exceptional fidelity and commitment to the mission of the seminary.

With retirement, Virginia’s ministry did not end. Until recently she served as hospitality coordinator for the Sisters’ guesthouse at Marylhurst and was active for many years as co-director of the SNJM Associate Program, planning meetings and retreats for Associates.

In all she did, Virginia brought a zest for life and an energetic spirit. If a helping hand was needed, Virginia was always there. She was generous with her time and enjoyed shopping for Sisters at Mary’s Woods and assisting Sisters to organize and downsize when they needed to move. She also helped each week in the Refugee Resettlement Office of Catholic Charities, volunteered at St. Andrew’s Emergency Services Center and periodically answered phones for Oregon Public Broadcasting. Throughout everything, she maintained her enthusiasm for life and accepted each day as God’s gift in whatever manner it unfolded.

Sister Virginia is survived by sisters, Louise Schroeder and Holy Names Sister Marilyn Schroeder, Salem, OR, and brother, Donald Schroeder (Margo), Redmond, OR, her nieces, nephews, cousins and members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

What It’s Like to Accompany Migrants at the U.S. Border

What It’s Like to Accompany Migrants at the U.S. Border

By Mary Becker, SNJM and Mary Ondreyco, SNJM

Two Holy Names Sisters are among the many volunteers who have been serving guests of Annunciation House in El Paso, Texas. They recently returned and shared their experiences in this report.

Annunciation House has been accompanying migrant, homeless and economically vulnerable peoples of the border since 1978. Recently with the influx of people from Latin America, Annunciation House has set up nine centers to continue this outreach and support. The people of El Paso have responded generously by providing daily meals, laundry service, transportation to bus stations or airport, translation services and clothes and food donations. Through the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, Annunciation House asked for religious Sisters and people affiliated with their communities to volunteer and help at the various centers. Many responded to this request. The Sisters of Loretto have provided housing for volunteers at their El Convento residence.

Ruben Garcia, the executive director of Annunciation House, has a working relationship with ICE. When the immigrants and asylum seekers are released daily from the Sub-Stations or Detention Centers, Ruben is notified and ICE buses then bring people to the Centers. The majority of people who arrive at our Center, Nazareth House, are fleeing violence and poverty in their home countries. They come with the clothes on their backs, worn shoes, hungry, thirsty, often carrying a baby or with young children prone to illness. Through all this they arrive with inner strength, hope, a desire to live in peace and to work and support their families.

All the guests had documents received from ICE that are their current ID. With these documents they can travel legally and are given a hearing date – usually within two weeks – where they need to appear in a federal court as part of the asylum process. At that hearing, depending on the judge, they could be allowed to continue the asylum process or they might be deported. 

We realize that the immigration issue in the U.S. is a very complex issue and we continue to read and discuss articles that help us to better understand this reality. Several articles we recommend are: “Moving ‘Beyond the Wall’: Immigration panel talks moral, practical solutions” (National Catholic Reporter, Feb.5, 2019) and these links to two articles: “The Ethics of Trump’s Border Wall” by Cardinal Joseph W. Tobin (New York Times, Jan. 30, 2019) and “Trump Does His Divisive El Paso Number” by Roger Cohen (New York Times, Feb. 8, 2019).

The receiving centers have 24-hour coverage by a site coordinator (7:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.) and by volunteers during the day and through the night. We worked the 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. shift each day and each of us took one night shift from 10:00 p.m.-7:00 a.m.   

During the day shift many things happened:

  • ICE officials brought those released from the processing centers to Nazareth House. Most days, two busloads of people arrived and the center accommodated up to 50 new arrivals along with the 40 or 50 others waiting for their departures to sponsors in various states.
  • Spanish-speaking volunteers helped with the intake procedure as well as welcoming the guests who weren’t quite sure where they were and who was helping them in this next step of the process. Water, snacks or a meal were provided and each new arrival was helped to select a change of gently used, clean clothing. Towels, toiletries, sheets, pillows and blankets were provided, and all enjoyed a hot refreshing shower.
  • Most meals were provided by El Paso volunteers but on several occasions we, the day volunteers, cooked and prepared the lunch or dinner for around 100 people. We always asked some of our guests to help us with the meal preparation, the serving of the meal and then the clean-up of the many pots and pans. The guests loved working with us in these activities.
  • Volunteers also aided in the general maintenance of the center – folding clean sheets, checking rooms, preparing snack bags for all traveling by bus or plane to their new locales and helping with medical needs or emergencies. (Nursing experience would have been helpful here!)

Before the volunteer time with Annunciation House, Mary O. participated in Capacitar workshops (holistic wellness practices) with people in Juarez and El Paso. Capacitar leaders have been working at the border for more than 10 years, and around 95 people participated in these workshops. The SNJM Ministry Fund provided funding for these workshops and for the planning of future workshops in border areas in El Paso and central and southern California.

On returning home and reflecting on our experiences, we are very grateful to the Holy Names community for your support, prayer and encouragement. We carried some of your donations with us and these enabled us to buy fresh salad, fruit and meat for the meals that we prepared for our guests. But most of all, we are grateful for the memories of the children and families, our guests, who left behind the violence and poverty of their home countries (as our own ancestors did) to start a new life here in the U.S., bringing with them much hope, spirit, determination and initiative.

Both Marys helping with serving dinner.

Guests in prayer.

Mary O. organizes clothing for guests’ travel.

Mary O. and guests clean up the kitchen.

Mary B and Sr. Alicia, SL, locate a guest’s family.

Cathy Olds, OP and Mary O. prepare intake packets.

Volunteers, Mary O. and Mary B. prepare dinner.

Honoring Our Commitment to Stand Against Human Trafficking

Honoring Our Commitment to Stand Against Human Trafficking

By Mary Annette Dworshak, SNJM

As we approach the feast day of St. Josephine Bakhita on Feb. 8, I struggle with the reality of global human trafficking. According to a September 2017 report from the International Labor Organization (ILO) and Walk Free Foundation: “An estimated 24.9 million victims are trapped in modern-day slavery. Of these, 16 million (64%) were exploited for labor, 4.8 million (19%) were sexually exploited, and 4.1 million (17%) were exploited in state-imposed forced labor.”

The numbers are staggering. The reality is dehumanizing.  In 2014, Pope Francis directly identified the immorality of human trafficking: “The human person ought never to be sold or bought as if he or she were a commodity. Whoever uses human persons in this way and exploits them, even if indirectly, becomes an accomplice of injustice.”

As a teacher of Contemporary Problems to high school seniors at Holy Names Academy in Seattle, WA, what can I do? In 2004 the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary adopted our corporate stand against human trafficking in which we promised to “educate ourselves and others regarding the magnitude, causes and consequences of this abuse, both wherever we are missioned and throughout the world.” We committed ourselves to work in collaboration to “advocate for policies and programs that address the prevention of trafficking or provide alternatives to women and children in danger of being trafficked.”

Fifteen years later, I wonder “What have I done?” Although I have not provided shelter to those trafficked in India or provided job skills training to survivors in Nigeria, as a member of our SNJM Justice Networks, I have collaborated with others to promote awareness about human trafficking, not only within our own community but in our schools in Lesotho, Manitoba, and the United States. Every year some of my students have participated in the Intercommunity Peace and Justice Center’s Just Video contest in which they have dramatically and effectively educated others about the tragic reality of human trafficking right here in Seattle along the I-5 corridor.

Sometimes a few of my students or colleagues have joined some of us on the First Sunday of the month for the IPJC Anti-Trafficking Vigil across the street from Seattle’s Westlake Center. After prayer, we stand holding our signs answering questions of the curious, listening to the stories of those who have been trafficked, or smiling at those who give us a “thumbs up” as they walk or drive by.

A few years ago, when the Sisters of the Holy Names focused on the issue of fracking and the Keystone XL Pipeline, I invited my students to research the impact of fracking upon water and the environment. We also explored the reality of the promise of the oil boom along with the impact on the economy of the surrounding area and the workers who moved there. The Jan. 28, 2019 issue of TIME reported on women who have been bought and sold in oil patch trafficking. Windie Jo Lazenko tells her own story, which prompted her to assist other trafficked victims.

Just last week in class, I assigned this topic to my students: “Two years ago the Sophomore Social Justice Committee studied human trafficking. What have you done about human trafficking since 2017?” I heard students respond, “I haven’t done too much; I am more conscious of where I shop and what I buy; I advise younger women to be more aware of their surroundings and social media; I have researched more about Fast Fashion and am concerned about labor trafficking, as well as sex trafficking.” What these comments say to me is that there are ways to work on stopping the demand through the lens of labor trafficking, as well as sex trafficking. 

There are ways in which each of us can make deliberate choices to refuse to be accomplices of injustice harming all of us in our common home.

Sister Mary Annette Dworshak teaches religion and serves as Peace and Justice Coordinator at Holy Names Academy in Seattle, WA.