IPJC Honors Linda Haydock, SNJM with Thea Bowman Award

IPJC Honors Linda Haydock, SNJM with Thea Bowman Award

May 11, 2021

Sister Linda speaks at IPJC’s virtual spring benefit.

The Intercommunity Peace & Justice Center has established an award in the name of pioneering educator Sister Thea Bowman, and Holy Names Sister Linda Haydock is the first recipient.

At the center’s spring benefit event on May 2, IPJC Board chair John Hickman recalled how Sister Linda, the center’s founding executive director, led the organization for over 25 years “to speak truth to power with love in chanceries and boardrooms (and) gathered youth in community and women on the margins to act for social change.”

When IPJC had its second convocation in 2001, Sister Thea, a Franciscan Sister of Perpetual Adoration, was part of its celebration of significant women in Catholic history. They were, Hickman said, “women who have shared their dreams for our church, trusted their vision, tended their faith and lit the fire of transformation.” He added, “We raised up Thea Bowman, a voice for justice and racial understanding. Tonight, we raise up and honor Sister Linda Haydock, a voice for justice who believes and lives, ‘If you dream it, you can do it!’”

Sister Linda gave the keynote address at the spring benefit, and Holy Names Sister Mary Rita Rohde joined with Franciscan Sister Pat Millen to open the virtual gathering with prayer. A recording of the event is available on YouTube.

In the 1980s, Sister Linda brought Sister Thea to Holy Names Academy in Seattle to meet and inspire her students. The students learned about her influential work to advance the education and life of black Catholics in a society dominated by white-controlled institutions and frequently racist attitudes. Sister Thea became a national presence as a teacher, preacher and powerful voice for multiculturalism and educational opportunities for disadvantaged Black people. Global Sisters Report published this story about her legacy in 2015.

Holy Names Sister Helps Select NETWORK’s New Leader

Holy Names Sister Helps Select NETWORK’s New Leader

April 23, 2021

Catherine Ferguson, SNJM speaking at the NETWORK leadership blessing ceremony.

Over the past decade or so, Catholic Sisters have become more visible in the U. S. political arena under the leadership of NETWORK and Sister Simone Campbell. When Sister Simone announced plans last year to retire from her position as executive director, a search committee led by Holy Names Sister Catherine Ferguson stepped up to identify who should lead NETWORK into its next stage.

The search ultimately led to Mary J. Novak becoming the organization’s new executive director this month. Sister Catherine, who has served on NETWORK’s board since 2018, says the process provided a good opportunity to articulate and affirm the values that mobilize members.

Sister Catherine says the search committee recognized the likelihood that a lay person would end up succeeding Sister Simone simply because there are fewer Catholic Sisters now. The committee’s primary focus was therefore on NETWORK’s core leadership needs – strategic vision, commitment to Catholic Social Justice teachings with a desire to work for an anti-racist system, a personal passion for mission and connections with politically influential people in Washington, D.C.

In addition to strong relationships built during many years of working among Catholic Sisters and Jesuits, Novak has been deeply involved in restorative justice. She was the founding Board Chair of Catholic Mobilizing Network (CMN), and helped it become an influential advocate for ending the death penalty and promoting restorative justice. An attorney who has worked on behalf of men on California’s death row, she also has served the Leadership Conference of Women Religious and has made a lifetime commitment as an Associate of the Congregation of St. Joseph.

There were certainly moments of wondering during the months of evaluating candidates, Sister Catherine said. “You have to ask, can we ever find someone who can possibly carry on? I think we’ve done a good job. Mary has great Catholic knowledge and commitment, and she’s very collaborative with staff so she can build on their strengths.” Another member of the NETWORK board wrote a prayer to use in the process, which includes this line: “We are seekers, searchers, dreamers and hopers. We are discerning together Your paths and the ways You are calling us to co-create and re-create your gap-mending vision of wholeness. We grow from the foundation laid by previous leaders of NETWORK, women who blazed new trails and took us to new heights.”

One way people can join in the work of growing that foundation is to join NETWORK and encourage friends and neighbors to do the same, Sister Catherine said. She also invites all to participate in upcoming NETWORK webinars to prepare for a kick-off rally and Virtual Lobby Day scheduled for May 11-12. Click here to learn more about how to prepare and participate.

Sisters Statement About the Derek Chauvin Verdict

Sisters Statement About the Derek Chauvin Verdict

April 20, 2021

As we reflect on the guilty verdict in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, our thoughts turn to the Black communities who have for so long struggled to secure equal protection of the law, safety for their families and respect for their humanity. As Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, we pray that this verdict will move our fractured society closer to healing.

We pray for George Floyd and his grieving family and community. We also pray for police officers and their families, and for the thousands of people who have engaged in peaceful protests against police killings of people of color in the U.S. Our prayer is that all may be free from the daily threat of violence, and that all may know the sacred value of their lives. In the days to come, as people respond to the news of this verdict, we urge nonviolence and a focus on our shared humanity.

Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary
U.S.-Ontario Province Leadership Team

Maureen Delaney, SNJM

Diane Enos, SNJM

Marcia Frideger, SNJM

Carol Higgins, SNJM

Linda Patrick, SNJM

Mary Slater, SNJM

 

Bird, Sister Carol

Bird, Sister Carol

Sister Carol Bird, SNJM

(Sister Miriam Paula)

February 19, 1933 – April 15, 2021

Sister Carol Bird, SNJM departed this life on April 15, 2021 in Portland, Oregon.

Sister Carol celebrated 88 years of life and 68 years of religious profession.

 Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

Sister Carol Bird, SNJM

(Sister Miriam Paula)

February 18, 1933 – April 15, 2021

Sister Carol Bird, SNJM, 88, died on April 15 in Portland. Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.Sister Carol Bird, SNJM, 88, died on April 15 in Portland. Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

The daughter of Paul and Nell Dalton Bird, Carol was born in North Bend, Ore. When she was quite young the family moved to The Dalles, Ore., where she grew up. Following her graduation from St. Mary’s Academy in The Dalles, she entered the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary at Marylhurst, Ore., eventually receiving the religious name Sister Miriam Paula.

Sister Carol’s entire career involved music — in the classroom, in the Church, and through private lessons. She taught piano, organ, choir and general music in Holy Names schools in Portland, Eugene, and Lake Oswego in Oregon and in Pomeroy, Seattle and Spokane in Washington.

“I always wanted to teach music,” Sister Carol said. “I wrote that request in my application letter for entering the convent and gratefully they granted my wish.” Over time, she received her education as a music educator at Marylhurst College (BM) and the University of Oregon (MM). For three years, she departed temporarily from her music career and served as attendance secretary at Portland’s St. Mary’s Academy.

As well as the “music nun,” Sister Carol was the “hiking nun.” When she was not teaching, performing or singing, she was drawn to the outdoors. Her hiking adventures culminated in a 400-mile hike with other Holy Names Sisters covering the entire Oregon section of the Pacific Crest Trail. On another occasion she was a guest on a one-month trip to India, including a pilgrimage to New Delhi, hikes to monasteries in the hills, and a week in Bombay.

Until she retired permanently, Sister Carol continued teaching private lessons to piano students.

Reflecting on her years in the SNJM Community, Sister Carol said, “I have had a wonderful life. Although it was not always easy, my religious experience has been absolutely amazing. And I have had the honor of living and working with wonderful women.”

A Holy Names Sister for 68 years, Sister Carol is survived by her sisters, Claire Penners (The Dalles) and Margaret Chastek (Spokane), her nieces and nephews, and members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to the Sisters of the Holy Names, PO Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

Mitchell, Sister Susan

Mitchell, Sister Susan

Sister Susan Ann Mitchell, SNJM

October 6, 1948 – March 31, 2021

Sister Susan Ann Mitchell, SNJM departed this life on March 31, 2021 in Portland, Oregon.

Sister Susan celebrated 72 years of life and 51 years of religious profession.

 Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

Sister Susan Ann Mitchell, SNJM

October 6, 1948 – March 31, 2021

Sister Susan Mitchell, SNJM, 72, died on March 31 in Portland, Ore. Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.  

The daughter of Ben and Grace Hanigan Mitchell, Jr., Susan was the oldest of five children. She was raised in a loving, Catholic family that lived on farms in St. Paul, Beaverton and Newberg, Ore. Hers was a family that worked, played, and prayed together. Sharing in the farm work and household chores, she learned responsibility and a strong work ethic. She was surrounded by a large extended family who have continued to stay connected throughout the years. Susan attended Catholic schools in Beaverton through grade seven, then went to Newberg public schools. She knew she wanted to be a Sister when she was a sophomore in high school. When she told her mother about this desire during her senior year, her mother, who had graduated from Marylhurst Normal School, introduced her to the Sisters of the Holy Names.

Following her high school graduation in 1966 Susan entered the Holy Names Sisters’ Novitiate at Marylhurst, Ore. She experienced historic changes during her five years of initial formation and study at Marylhurst. Vatican II, which initiated groundbreaking changes in the Church and in religious life, had ended the year before. Her first year as a postulant was very much religious life as it had been lived: wearing the traditional long postulant dress, following the common schedule of prayer, work, study, silence and recreation. The years that followed were ones of stimulating and energizing transition to updated dress, theology, and community life.

With the completion of a BS in Education at Marylhurst College, Sister Susan’s first ministry was as a primary teacher for 18 years in Oregon SNJM schools including Holy Redeemer, Portland; Our Lady of the Lake, Lake Oswego, and St. Joseph’s, Salem. These years were an often-tumultuous time of transition in religious life as many Sisters responding to the unmet needs of those on the margins of society began new ministries.

Sister Susan’s next ministry evolved after being introduced by a friend to L’Arche, an international federation of communities of faith where people with and without intellectual disabilities share life and create home together. In 1990 she joined the L’Arche community in Portland whose first home was newly opened. For the next 23 years she lived and worked at L’Arche Portland where she helped to open a second home and assumed the roles of Assistant, Community Coordinator, and finally Community Leader/Executive Director. Sister Susan retired from L’Arche Portland in 2013, remaining an active member of its extended community as a volunteer and participant in community activities.

 Most recently, Sister Susan served as Community Life Coordinator for the Sisters of the Holy Names living at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst, a continuing care retirement community, sponsored by the Holy Names Sisters.

 A Holy Names Sister for 51 years, Sister Susan is survived by her brothers and sisters Ben (Kayla) Mitchell, Margaret (Bob) Reed, Will (Denise) Mitchell, Mary Rietze, her nieces and nephews, her many friends, members of the L’Arche community and members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to the Sisters of the Holy Names, PO Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

Antonich, Sister Rosemary

Antonich, Sister Rosemary

Sister Rosemary Antonich, SNJM

(Sister M. Catherine Margaret)

August 23, 1928 – March 21, 2021

Sister Rosemary Antonich, SNJM departed this life on March 21, 2021 at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Rosemary celebrated 92 years of life and 69 years of religious profession.

 Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

Sister Rosemary Antonich, SNJM

Sister M. Catherine Margaret

August 23, 1928 – March 21, 2021

Sister Rosemary Antonich, SNJM, 92, died on March 21 at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego. Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

Rosemary was the eldest daughter of Anthony “Tony” and Estella Muir Antonich. Estella came to Astoria as a very young schoolteacher where she met and married Tony. They spent the rest of their lives in Astoria, raising their three daughters, Rosemary, Katherine, and Margaret. The girls attended Star of the Sea School for 12 years, a grade and high school operated by the Sisters of Holy Names. They were a musical family, and the Star of the Sea music teachers fostered the girls’ talents.

Through their help, Rosemary won a full scholarship to Marylhurst College to study piano.  After her third year in college Rosemary made the decision to enter the Holy Names Sisters’ novitiate at Marylhurst and chose the religious name Sister M. Catherine Margaret after her two sisters.

Receiving her baccalaureate degree in music, she taught piano and organ at several Holy Names schools in Oregon and Washington including Portland, Seattle, Spokane, The Dalles, Eugene, St. Helens, and Lake Oswego. During this time she earned a Master in Music Education from the University of Oregon. Her last assignment was Holy Redeemer School in North Portland where she taught for 33 years.

In 1995, Sister Rosemary attended an international Suzuki conference in Dublin, Ireland, and incorporated Suzuki techniques into her teaching. She also taught for over 10 years in the prestigious music camp of Young Musicians and Artists, giving her a chance to work with some of the West Coast’s most talented children. Additionally, she served as an organist in several parishes.

When she moved to Mary’s Woods, a continuing care retirement community at Marylhurst, Sister Rosemary readily offered her services as a music minister, playing the organ and piano for religious services in the Sisters’ Chapel in the Provincial House. She was also a popular favorite at Mary’s Woods social gatherings for which she provided lively musical performances and spirited accompaniment to community sing-a-longs.

Sister Rosemary pursued another artistic talent over the years, adding watercolor painting to her accomplishments. The scenery of her native city of Astoria was a continuing inspiration to her, and among the paintings she produced, many of them were of beautiful places in Astoria. She said of her hometown, “Although I no longer have family in Astoria, I love to go back every chance I get, and among my closest friends are those I made at Star of the Sea.”

Sister Rosemary is survived by her sister Margaret McCarty, nephews and cousins and the members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to the Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

Sisters Denounce Atlanta Shooting and Violence Against Asian Americans

Sisters Denounce Atlanta Shooting and Violence Against Asian Americans

March 23, 2021

As the leadership team of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, U.S.-Ontario Province, we respond with heartbroken prayer and outrage to the fatal shooting of eight people in Atlanta, GA on March 16. Once again, communities are left to grapple with grief and shattered peace, while families are left with irreparable losses and aching hearts. This outburst of violence brings echoes of the dehumanizing public statements that have so often targeted people of Asian heritage, especially during the past year. It also reminds us that almost unfettered access to guns in the U.S. continues to cost precious lives.

We unite our voices with those who demand an end to the immoral discrimination and violence against Asian people and other communities of color. A public statement from Ramona Convent Secondary School leaders Sister Kathleen Callaway and Jacqueline Quiñones Sienkowski, JD identifies the terrible toll of this embedded racism in our society: “It’s important to remind ourselves that racism impacts communities in distinct ways, but it impacts all of us profoundly. From anti-Asian violence to the horrific pandemic death toll in Black, Indigenous, and Latino communities, to the white supremacist insurrection at the Capitol, structural racism impacts all of us. Violence, hatred, and racial slurs directed toward any group are unacceptable.”

We applaud the bishops and other faith leaders who have swiftly condemned bigotry and violence towards Asian Americans. Some of the public statements that we welcome and support include:

  • Atlanta Archbishop Gregory J. Hartmayer, OFM, Conv.: “We must, as a Christian family of faith, speak up against any aggression and we must be active in our pursuit to end racism and discrimination of every kind.”
  • Chicago Cardinal Blase Cupich: “It is incumbent on all Christians, all Americans, to resist subtle and overt acts of bigotry, to build up the common good through acts of love for all our neighbors, near and far.”
  • Pax Christi: “Charleston. Pittsburgh. Atlanta. Once more we have seen what appears to be the devastating result of racial hatred and our nation’s inability to address gun violence.”

We renew our pledge to continue our efforts to bring about sane corporate policies and legislation to eliminate easy access to deadly weapons that have been used countless times by those motivated by hatred. We are committed to respecting human life and dignity, and to active collaboration with those who seek justice and peace for all people.

Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary
U.S.-Ontario Province Leadership Team

Maureen Delaney, SNJM

Diane Enos, SNJM

Marcia Frideger, SNJM

Carol Higgins, SNJM

Linda Patrick, SNJM

Mary Slater, SNJM

 

Basick, Sister Magdalen

Basick, Sister Magdalen

Sister Magdalen Basick, SNJM

(Sister Ruth Ann Mary)

January 25, 1916 – March 12, 2021

Sister Magdalen Basick, SNJM departed this life on March 12, 2021 at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Magdalen celebrated 105 years of life and 85 years of religious profession.

 Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

Sister Magdalen Basick, SNJM

Sister Ruth Ann Mary

January 25, 1916 – March 12, 2021

Sister Magdalen Basick, SNJM, 105, died on March 12 at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

Magdalen was the daughter of Matt and Anna Markovich Basick, who both came from Croatia in the early 1900s but met and married in Colorado. When Magdalen was 18 mos. old her father was killed in a railroad construction accident. Her mother married John Yurkovich when Magdalen was 8. Her siblings included sisters, Sister Mary Doloreen (Catherine), Marie, Sister Joseph Mary (Mary), Anne, Matilda (Plowman); brother, Daniel; and half-brother, Emil.

Magdalen grew up on a small farm near Helvetia, Oregon, in a home without electricity or running water.  During grade school, she attended a rural school with four grades in a room. Interested in furthering her children’s education, it was through a Protestant teacher at Lincoln high school in Portland that her mother heard about St. Mary’s Academy and the Holy Names Sisters. Arrangements were made for her older sister Catherine, the first of the Basick girls, to attend as a student boarder. 

When it was her turn to leave home as a 13 year old, Sister Magdalen recalled how hard it was, saying that “I cried every day until Thanksgiving.” But as was her nature, she stuck with it and became a good and well-liked student, earning the position of Sodality Prefect, the highest student office after student body president.

Like her two older sisters, Magdalen entered the Sisters of the Holy Names after graduation and later received the religious name Sister Ruth Ann Mary. She taught elementary school for many years, becoming one of those famed eighth grade teachers loved and remembered by her students. She taught in Seattle, Spokane, Medford, Coos Bay, St. Paul, Eugene and Salem, and served as principal at Our Lady of the Lake School in Lake Oswego. 

Her last teaching assignment was at Holy Redeemer School in Portland. However, her connection with the parish did not end when she left the classroom as she stayed on as bookkeeper and office helper until she reached her 90s when she moved to Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst to be with her sister, Sister Joseph Mary. 

Most recently, Sister Magdalen happily celebrated her 105th birthday and her 85th anniversary as a Sister of the Holy Names.

Sister Magdalen is remembered fondly by Sisters, family, students and friends. She was an excellent teacher with some of her students keeping a connection with her to this day, even from her very first class in Coos Bay, Oregon, many, many years ago. In her long years at Holy Redeemer in Portland, she had a large backyard garden where they had fresh vegetables, fruits, and flowers because of her. She was also a master at knitting and crocheting and created many delicate and intricate pieces. However, what is most universally remembered of Sister Magdalen is that she was someone always interested in your story, always available to help, and eminently practical. She was a woman with a zest for life, a deeply prayerful spirit, and a love of richness of God’s creation.

Sister Magdalen is survived by her nieces and nephews and members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to the Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

Hortsch, Sister Donna

Hortsch, Sister Donna

Sister Donna Hortsch, SNJM

(Sister Leonard Mary)

January 22, 1935 – February 28, 2021

Sister Donna Hortsch, SNJM departed this life on February 28, 2021 at Mary’s Woods in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Donna celebrated 86 years of life and 66 years of religious profession.

 Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced later.

Sister Donna Horstch, SNJM

Sister Leonard Mary

January 22, 1935 – February 28, 2021

Sister Donna Hortsch, SNJM, 86, died on Feb. 28 in Lake Oswego. Due to COVID-19, a funeral Mass will be celebrated later.Sister Donna Hortsch, SNJM, 86, died on Feb. 28 in Lake Oswego. Due to COVID-19, a funeral Mass will be celebrated later.

The daughter of Leonard and Elizabeth Dennis Hortsch, Donna grew up in The Dalles with her sisters, Eileen and Beverly. Following her high school graduation from St. Mary’s Academy in The Dalles, she entered the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary at Marylhurst receiving the name Sister Leonard Mary.

Sister Donna brought creativity and energy to the classroom during her 16-year career as an elementary teacher in Holy Names schools in Salem, Medford, Eugene and Portland and at the Christie School, Marylhurst. When she left teaching, she spent two years in the Sisters’ Care Center. She then refocused her ministry to parish work and pastoral care. Her work as Minister to the Elderly and Pastoral Associate at St. Francis Parish, Portland, had a profound effect on her. “I came out of those experiences a different woman, really became ‘myself’ there,” she said. 

After St. Francis, she returned to healthcare doing home care. She also volunteered with the NW Pilot Project, which serves downtown Portland’s low-income elderly.

A new chapter began for Sister Donna when she retired. She retired she said so that she would have the energy to experience that part of life. She applied her energy to working on archeological projects in Oregon and Washington and expanding her knowledge through travel and as a volunteer for the NW Film Center. She took part in archeological digs and studies of old Forest Service camps that predated World War II and a depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp that revealed a 6,000-year-old Native American migration camp stop. She also continued with some home care. 

A student of the Scriptures Sister Donna remained active in pastoral activities offering workshops in Biblical studies. Among her greatest experiences in life were her travels to the lands of the Bible. Of her travels she noted that she was educated by her pilgrimages following the routes of St. Paul. It was amazing she said. When she was a child, Europe was the other side of the world, not a place where she thought she would ever go. Her first time in Rome, she cried at the thrill of it. She went on to say, “My study of scripture, my bond to Jesus Christ, and the people I have connected with along the way have opened doors for me that are amazing. And now I really appreciate the history I’ve come to know, from reading, archeology and my travels.”

Her final move was to Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst retirement community where she remained active in resident life and continued with her avocation in biblical studies.

A Holy Names Sister for 66 years, Sister Donna is survived by her sister Eileen Brady, her nieces and nephews, and members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to the Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

New Province Leadership Team Gets to Work, Virtually

New Province Leadership Team Gets to Work, Virtually

March 5, 2021

As 2021 began, still deep in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, the Sisters of the Holy Names welcomed a new leadership team in the U.S.-Ontario Province. Members of the team started their term like no other team before them – setting their priorities, meeting with committees and directing lay staff all via Zoom for the sake of health and safety.

Even the leadership transition ritual in January was virtual, with Sisters and Affiliates ringing bells at home and waving at one another from their computer screens instead of chapel pews.

The Province Leadership Team, selected through a long discernment process that unfolded through most of 2020, includes six Sisters with diverse backgrounds, ministries and interests. Here are brief introductions to each.

Diane Enos, SNJM was born and raised on the island of Oahu in the Hawaiian Islands. Sr. Diane came to California to attend Holy Names College in Oakland, CA, then entered the SNJM community after graduation in 1966. She taught at Holy Names High School and Holy Names College, both in Oakland, for about 20 years before earning a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at St. Louis University in Missouri. She worked as a clinical psychologist in Northern California for another 20 years before retirement. For the past several years she has been active in a variety of USON committees.

A native of San Francisco, Marcia Frideger, SNJM was educated by Holy Names Sisters at St. Anselm’s School in San Anselmo, CA and Marin Catholic High School. She entered the novitiate in 1963, had her juniorate at College of the Holy Names, earned a master’s degree in organizational behavior at Brigham Young University, and a Ph.D. at University of CA, Irvine.  She taught at St. Ignatius Elementary School in Sacramento, Holy Names High School and Holy Names University in Oakland, and Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania. She previously served on the Province Leadership Team from 2011-2015. In recent years, she ministered as SNJM liaison with the Sisters of the Holy Family and as Candidate Director.

Originally from Eugene, OR, Carol Higgins, SNJM entered the SNJM community in Portland. She taught at Holy Cross and Holy Redeemer in Portland and St. Peter’s in Ontario, OR, where she became principal. After getting her Master of Divinity degree from Marylhurst University and Doctor of Ministry in Christian Spirituality degree from Washington Theological Union in Washington, D.C., she taught and worked in campus ministry at Marylhurst University, later joining the faculty of St. Mary’s Academy in Portland.

Linda Patrick, SNJM was born in Portland, OR and grew up in Holy Redeemer parish, taught by Holy Names teachers. After entering the Sisters of the Holy Names in 1967, she obtained an education degree from Marylhurst College and taught at St. Ignatius, Holy Redeemer and The Madeleine School in Portland. She spent 20 years as an administrator at St. Mary’s Academy, while serving on SNJM committees including taking the lead in organizing the Sisters’ most significant recent events, the provincial Chapters held in 2018 and 2020. She is a longtime volunteer with Saint André Bessette Church’s ministry to guests who live on the streets or in single rooms in downtown Portland.

For decades, St. James Cathedral in Seattle relied on the calm and analytical mind of Mary Slater, SNJM, who served as their longtime bookkeeper. With a degree in Accounting from Western Washington State College, she is a valued member of the HNA Board of Trustees and Finance Committee, as well as a trustee of the SNJM Charitable Trust. A Sister since 1983, St. Mary served on the Leadership Discernment Committee that guided the process of discerning the incoming PLT.

Maureen Delaney, SNJM, who has served as provincial leader since 2016, is continuing in that role. Sr. Maureen attended Holy Names High School in Oakland and after becoming a Sister, taught at St. Augustine’s, Our Lady of Lourdes, Old Saint Mary’s and St. Francis de Sales schools in Oakland. She became active in supporting community leaders in West Oakland and did that work for years, including her time on the staff of St. Francis de Sales Cathedral. In 1987, she visited the Mississippi Delta, which led to her return to the Delta to start the Outreach Department of the Tutwiler Clinic. That led to the founding the Tutwiler Community Education Center, where Sr. Maureen led educational and recreational programs for nearly 30 years.