Vow Ceremony of Lourdes Quintana, SNJM

Vow Ceremony of Lourdes Quintana, SNJM

 

Cermony attendees.

 

Sister Lourdes’ vow ceremony. R-L: Sisters Kathleen Ross, Mary Ondreyco, Ana Maria Vilca Mamani and Lourdes Quintana.

 

Sister Lourdes’ vow ceremony. R-L: Sisters Kathleen Ross, Lourdes Quintana and Ana Maria Vilca Mamani.

 

Sister Lourdes’ vow ceremony. R-L: Sisters Kathleen Ross, Lourdes Quintana and Ana Maria Vilca Mamani.

 

Attending a local celebration. R-L: Sisters Marina Rose Parisi, Ana Maria Vilca Mamani and Kathleen Ross.

 

Attending a local celebration.

 

Attending a local celebration.

 

Attending a local celebration. L-R: Sisters Ana Maria Vilca Mamani and Marina Rose Parisi.

 

Attending a local celebration.

Kratz, Sister Eleanor

Kratz, Sister Eleanor

Sister Eleanor Kratz, SNJM

(Sister Christa Mary)

April 9, 1936 – September 28, 2019

Sister Eleanor Kratz, SNJM departed this life on September 28, 2019 at Marie Rose Center, Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Eleanor celebrated 83 years of life and 63 years of her religious profession.

Mass of Resurrection was celebrated on Thursday, October 17, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. at Chapel of the Holy Names, Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Burial will take place following the funeral at Holy Names Cemetery, Marylhurst, Oregon.

Simpson, Sister Dorothy

Simpson, Sister Dorothy

Sister Dorothy Simpson, SNJM

(Sister M. Catherine Regina)

February 18, 1930 – September 15, 2019

Sister Dorothy Simpson, SNJM departed this life on September 15, 2019 at Mercy Retirement and Care Center in Oakland, California.

Sister Dorothy celebrated 89 years of life and 69 years of her religious profession.

Mass of Resurrection was celebrated on Sunday, September 22, 2019, at 2:30 p.m. at Holy Spirit Chapel, Campbell, California.

Burial took place Monday, September 23, 2019 at 10:15 a.m. at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Hayward, California.

 

Sister Dorothy Simpson, SNJM

M. Catherine Regina

February 18, 1930 – September 15, 2019

“You are so beautiful,” “God loves you” were Sister Dorothy’s greetings when one visited her at Mercy Center in her latter days.  She was a quintessential San Franciscan.  Her grandparents were born there, her parents were born there and so was she and her brother Harold.  I imagine that when she went downtown to shop at the White House or the City of Paris, Dorothy would have worn hat and gloves like all the women of San Francisco.

Their little white house was always a symbol of security and happiness.  Her mother was extremely devoted and centered around the family.  Her motto was “children should be seen and not heard” and she “unconsciously prepared her two children  for a life of obedience by demanding that they never allow themselves “the least word, the least sign or the least reflection contrary to holy obedience.”

While Dorothy’s mother was her “greatest help and confidant”  her father was “her ideal, a noble soul, a man of principle, quiet, dignified and most gentle.  He never raised his voice; whatever he said was worth” listening to.  Mr. Simpson took Dorothy for long walks and would talk to her as if she were an adult.  Her dad was not always serious; he would tease and joke with the family in his gentle, affectionate way.

When Dorothy and her brother Harold grew into their teens the family adopted the title, “The Inseparable Simpsons.”  They were unified but that did not keep Dorothy from leading an active teen life:  basketball, the school paper where she adopted her byline “Dot” a name which her father did not like, sodality projects, fashion shows and dances, dances, dances.

Sister first met the Holy Names Sisters at St Cecilia’s where she attended the grammar school and received her First Holy Communion.  The Children of Mary Sodality was her contact in high school with the Sisters of the Holy Names and was the channel of graces for her vocation.  Life continued quite normally until Dorothy’s seventeenth year when a sudden illness assailed her.  She determined  that if she recovered she “would attempt the Religious Life.”  Her vocation “took the form, not of a gentle, persuasive call from the Divine Master, but of an interior force impelling [her] to enter Religious Life.”  Sister’s choice of Holy Names came from the unity and charity that she observed in our Sisters.

Sister entered the Novitiate in Oakland at the age of eighteen, a crushing blow for her mother (even though she had given her consent.)  Mrs. Simpson suffered from tremendous loneliness with the absence of Dorothy.  Besides learning about the religious life, methods of prayer and community living, Dorothy had classes in methodology: methods in teaching catechism, arithmetic, reading, art and so she began her career of twenty years in the elementary level, teaching and reveling in preparing children for the reception of Holy Communion.

In 1970, having taken courses to prepare her to teach theology, Sister spent the next eleven as chairman of the Religion Dept at Holy Names University teaching religious studies.  As a member of one of her classes, I can attest to her ability to clearly present and explain the Scriptures to us.

It was in 1981 that Sister began the most satisfactory phase of her life: pastoral ministry.  This was an exceptionally happy period of her life, living in the formation house at Assumption parish in San Leandro, ministering at Corpus Christi parish, teaching Scripture to adults, coordinating the R.C.I.A. program under the pastor Gino Walsh who generously lent his cabin in Tahoe to Dorothy and many of her friends in the summer.  (An aside: we did our own cooking at Assumption and Dorothy did her duty, but those of us who lived there remember that when Dorothy’s turn to cook came, she would use every pot available; the problem was that the cook never had to do the dishes so it fell on us to clean up all her pots and pans.)  Mrs. Simpson would visit Assumption on big feasts accompanied by Dorothy’s nieces, Kathi and Karen.  These were always joyous occasions.    Corpus Christi was an exceptionally happy period of her life when she made life-long friends, became a god-mother and explained Scripture but her happiness peaked in January of 1990 in a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

After her years at Corpus Christi, Sister Dorothy had a sabbatical which included her visit to the Holy Land and studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley.  Afterwards she moved to Southern California where she continued her work with adults in three different parishes.

Perhaps over and above her ministries is Dorothy’s appreciation of Community life, for her, the hallmark of religious life.  She felt it to be the integrating factor in her chaste, poor and obedient consecration to God. It is in Community that she found her greatest peace and joy.  She believed that living in community  in the Spirit of the Gospel is what  religious life is all about.

Several of Dorothy’s friends—religious and lay—wrote on her passing what a help she was in advising, helping, her love of nature, her faithfulness and her devotion in visiting Sister Frances Franey in her declining years.

Dear Dorothy, you were unique.  I do hope that the angels in Heaven are washing any pot and pans that were left behind.  We will miss you.

SMD 9/22/2019

Remembrances may be made to Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

Sister Linda Haydock to Speak on Human Trafficking

Sister Linda Haydock to Speak on Human Trafficking

Sister Linda Haydock, congregational leader of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, will give a talk about recognizing, understanding and working to end human trafficking in a public presentation on Sept. 27.

Sister Linda’s presentation in Marylhurst, OR will address where and how human trafficking takes place, progress that has been made and practical suggestions for influencing business practices to help bring about change.

As a global congregation, the Sisters of the Holy Names have maintained opposition to trafficking in women and children as a corporate stand – one of their principal commitments – since 2004. In collaboration with other religious congregations and nongovernmental organizations, they have advocated for policies and programs that address the prevention of trafficking and worked to provide alternatives for women and children in danger of being trafficked. Holy Names Sisters have supported training hotel and hospitality workers to recognize the signs of human trafficking, participated in silent vigils and been involved in many other public witness activities.

Sister Linda became the first executive director of the Intercommunity Peace and Justice Center (IPJC) when it was formed in 1991 with the Sisters of the Holy Names as one of its founding congregations. Working to stop modern-day slavery is among IPJC’s major activities. After nurturing IPJC’s growth as a community-building force for systemic change for 26 years, in 2017 she became leader of her religious congregation. She is the recipient of the 2016 Archbishop Raymond G. Hunthausen Humanitarian Award.

Her talk is scheduled for 2:00 PM on Sept. 27 in the Chapel of the Holy Names, located in Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst, 17400 Holy Names Dr., Lake Oswego, OR. There is no cost to attend but space is limited. Please click here for details and to reserve seats by Sept. 19.

LCWR 2019

LCWR 2019

   

LCWR, 2019.

 

LCWR, 2019.

 

LCWR, 2019.

 

LCWR, 2019.

 

LCWR, 2019.

 

LCWR, 2019.

 

LCWR, 2019.

Public Statement on Gun Violence in Texas and Ohio

Public Statement on Gun Violence in Texas and Ohio

The violent attacks and loss of life in El Paso, TX and Dayton, OH last weekend leave us shocked and saddened. We pray for the victims and their families and for all the people who are suffering because of these senseless and hateful acts.

We join our voices with the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, which once again has called for stronger measures to address gun violence. LCWR has spoken out against those who incite anger and fear, which too often results in mass killings. We too commit ourselves to action on behalf of all who are threatened by pervasive gun violence. One step has been to participate in shareholder resolutions that ask weapons manufacturers to identify ways they could limit fatal shootings and avoid negative impacts on human rights.

We pray for those whose thoughts turn to acts of violence, that they will recognize the evil of that choice and their freedom to choose instead the way of peace and respect for the life of every human being.

We share the following “Prayer for Peace:”

Philippians 4:4-7
“Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.” (NIV)

Sometimes words are not enough
to express the language of our hearts,
sometimes minds are filled
with prayers without expression.

Sometimes there are not enough
spare moments in each day,
sometimes regret is all
we have as our confession.

Sometimes faith is not enough
but in the presence of your peace,
sometimes prayer can be
a quiet conversation.

Sometimes words are not enough
to express the anguish on our hearts,
sometimes prayers are answered
that remain unspoken.

 

Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary
U.S.-Ontario Province Leadership Team
Mary Breiling, SNJM
Maureen Delaney, SNJM
Guadalupe Guajardo, SNJM
Margaret Kennedy, SNJM
Mary Rita Rohde, SNJM

Lewis, Sister Jane

Lewis, Sister Jane

Sister Jane Lewis, SNJM

(Sister M. Gertrude Theresa)

January 30, 1926 – July 29, 2019

Sister Margaret Jane Lewis, SNJM departed this life on July 29, 2019 at Marie Rose Center, Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Sister Jane celebrated 93 years of life and 74 years of her religious profession.

Mass of Ressurection was celebrated on Wednesday, August 14, 2019, at 11:00 a.m. at Chapel of the Holy Names, Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Burial took place following the funeral at Holy Names Cemetery, Marylhurst, Oregon.

 

Sister Jane Lewis, SNJM

M. Gertrude Theresa

January 30, 1926 – July 29, 2019

Sister Jane Lewis, age 93, died at Marie-Rose Center at Mary’s Woods in Lake Oswego, Oregon, July 29, 2019. A member of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary for 74 years, her funeral will be held at 11 a.m., August 14, 2019, in the Chapel of the Holy Names, Marylhurst, Oregon. Burial follows in Holy Names Cemetery, Marylhurst.

Born Margaret Jane, Sister Jane was the daughter of Cliff and Edna Ryan Lewis growing up in California. She joined the Holy Names Sisters there in 1943, eventually received the religious name Sister M. Gertrude Theresa and made first profession of vows in 1945.

Her ministry career was spent in Holy Names and/or Catholic elementary schools in Altadena, San Francisco, Santa Monica, Alhambra, Los Gatos, Los Angeles, and Pasadena as a teacher and in Glendale and Burbank as a principal. During this time she completed a B.A. in Education and English and a Master of Education from Mt. St. Mary’s College, Los Angeles. From 1973-80 she worked for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles Office of Education as Elementary Education Supervisor.

Upon retiring she volunteered in educational settings, including Puente Learning Center, Los Angeles, and St. Andrew’s Grade School, Pasadena. In 2008, at the invitation of a close friend and former student, Sister Jane moved to Portland, Oregon. Most recently she was a member of the Sisters’ retirement community at Mary’s Woods at Marylhurst.

 In a tribute to Sister Jane on the occasion of her 50th Jubilee as a Holy Names Sister, it was written of her that she was “educator par-excellence, sensitive woman, listener to and gentle reassurer of the young, woman of prayer, resourceful, gracious provider of a place of beauty and peace for all of us.” She is remembered by teachers she worked with as a supportive mentor, by children she taught as a caring and encouraging teacher and by their parents as a committed educator and listener. She is also remembered for her wonderful sense of humor, one person recalling that she could be “a tease but a ‘great lady’ – always kind and thoughtful.”

Sister Jane is survived by her sisters, Helen Nickerson (Tujunga, California) and Myra Wilson (Soldotna, Alaska), her nieces and nephew, and the members of her religious community. Remembrances may be made to Sisters of the Holy Names, P.O. Box 398, Marylhurst, OR 97036 or online at www.snjmusontario.org/donate.

June 8 Celebration – Albany, NY

June 8 Celebration – Albany, NY

* We were not able to gather the names of everyone in these photos prior to posting this slideshow. If you recognize anyone who is not named in the captions, please let us know. Click here to email Blynda Barnett. Thank you!

St. Joseph Chapel, Albany, New York, June 8, 2019.

St. Joseph Chapel, Albany, New York, June 8, 2019.

L-R: Viola Persia and Ron Musto.

Janet Walton, SNJM, left.

Shannon Lenet, Associate, right.

Molia Sieh, SNJM, Kathleen Pritty, RSM and friend.

Janet Walton, SNJM

Mary Anne Vigliante

Michele Musto

Academy of the Holy Names Choir Ensemble with conductor, Theresa Moran.

Academy of the Holy Names Choir Ensemble.

Virginia Bonan, SNJM

 

Kathy Yanas

Kathy Yanas

 Elizabeth Kavanaugh

Carroll Ann Kemp, SNJM

Carroll Ann Kemp, SNJM

Bea Hall, SNJM

Bea Hall, SNJM

Marilyn Marx, SNJM

Marilyn Marx, SNJM

Shannon Lenet, Associate

Shannon Lenet, Associate

Mary Ann Dunn, SNJM.

 

Mary Ann Dunn, SNJM

Visiting in the Chapel.

 

Visiting in the Chapel.

 

Kathleen Keller, SNJM.

 

Kathleen Keller, SNJM.

 

Mary Ellen Holohan, SNJM

 

Karyl Fredericks, SNJM

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM, Ann Marean, SNJM and Rhea Clark.

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM and Rhea Clark.

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM extinguishing the flame, with Rhea Clark.

 

Maureen Delaney, SNJM and Rhea Clark.

 

Janet Walton, SNJM, Maureen Delaney, SNJM and Rhea Clark, AHN Trustee.

 

Bea Hall, SNJM and Kathleen Griffin, SNJM.

 

Vicki Cummings and Maureen Delaney, SNJM.

 

The reception begins.

 

The reception begins. Kathy Yanas, center.

 

The reception begins. Shannon Lenet, Associate, far left.

 

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

 

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

 

Alumni of AHN, L-R: Mary Rita Siciliano Cratty and Judi Myers Cavanaugh.

 

Friends of AHN/SNJM.

 

Reception entertainment, L-R: Ron Musto, Michael Hurt and Gary Nowik.

 

Vicki Cummings, Susan Bues and Maureen Delaney, SNJM.

Reconnecting, L-R: Mary Gay Norris Wood and Ann Marean, SNJM.

L-R: Joan Bailey and Bonnie Bailey Wisnewski.

L-R: Claire Houle Burdick and Judi Myers Cavanaugh.

Friends of AHN/SNJM. Shannon Lenet, Associate, center.

Friends of AHN/SNJM. Marilyn Marx, SNJM (left) and Belinda Pineda Haden (center).

AHN Choir Ensemble members.

Friends of AHN/SNJM. L-R: Sue Doemel (AHN Art teacher), Louise Kavanaugh, Elizabeth Kavanaugh and Chuck Kavanaugh (former Board Chair).

L-R: Mary Ann Dunn, SNJM, Donna Nord Wickert, Eileen Dunn, SNJM, Elaine Fernandez and Mary Glavin, SNJM.

Patricia Mills, SNJM

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.

Stained Glass Windows in Albany Chapel, June 8, 2019.